Cover of: Gender and the language of illness | Jonathan Charteris-Black

Gender and the language of illness

  • 4.10 MB
  • 469 Downloads
  • English
by
Palgrave Macmillan , New York
StatementJonathan Charteris-Black, Clive Seale
ContributionsSeale, Clive
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRB212 .C53 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24579766M
ISBN 139780230222359
LC Control Number2010011787

Gender and the Language of Illness does what it says on the tin – it presents a detailed descriptive account of the way a sample of women and men verbalised their experiences of illness – and I would certainly recommend it to linguists interested in gender and/or corpus analysis.

For readers who approach it from the perspective of health Cited by: 1. Gender and the language of illness --Methods for investigating gender and language --Men's traditional discourse of illness: distancing and avoidance --A feminine discourse of illness: transformation and modality --Emotional disclosure: socio-economic classification, age and gender --Experience of support: gender, social class and age --Illness.

An investigation of the influence of gender, social class, age and illness type in the language of people talking about their experiences of illness. It shows evidence of both conformity with and resistance to gender stereotypes. : Gender and the Language of Illness (): J.

Charteris-Black, C. Seale: Books1/5(1). "The book is engagingly written and remains a key textbook for students and junior researchers in the field." Discourse and Communication "The author moves smoothly and coherently from more traditional approaches to language and gender through to very recent research in areas such as discourse and consumerism, and language, gender and by:   Gender and the Language of Illness Gender and the Language of Illness Cameron, Deborah Charteris‐Black, J.

and Seale, C.

Description Gender and the language of illness FB2

Gender and the Language of Illness. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp £ (hbk). ‐0‐‐ ‐9 On the day I began reading Gender and the Language of Illness, a UK junior health. Abstract. This book is based on interviews with people talking about their experiences of many different types of illness.

Their use of language shows the influences of gender, social class and age and reveals conformity and resistance to gender by: Gender and the Language of Illness Jonathan Charteris-Black, Clive Seale.

This book presents an investigation of the influence of gender, social class, age and illness type in the language of people talking about their experiences of illness.

It shows evidence of both conformity with and resistance to gender stereotypes. The Handbook of Language and Gender is a collection of articles written by leading specialists in the field that examines the dynamic ways in which women and men develop and manage gendered identities through their talk.

Provides a comprehensive, up-to-date, and stimulating picture of the field for students and researchers in a wide range of disciplines. This is a new introduction to the study of the relation between gender and language use, written by two of the leading experts in the field.

It covers the main topics, beginning with a clear. It covers the main topics, beginning with a clear discussion of gender and of the resources that the linguistic system offers for the construction of social meaning. The body of the book offers unprecedented breadth and depth in its This is a new introduction to the study of the relation between gender and language use, written by two of the /5.

An investigation of the influence of gender, social class, age and illness type in the language of people talking about their experiences of illness. It shows evidence of both conformity with and Author: Louise Mullany.

Social Class Gender Identity Gender Stereotype Illness Experience Language Ideology These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm by: Carefully situated within contemporary discourse of illness and pain, this book explores the exchange between language, politics, and culture in memoirs of disease.

The book is exceedingly thorough and well researched, and is thus a terrific bibliographic resource for. Particular attention is paid in this chapter to the portrayal of illness, disease and death in literature and popular culture and changes in metaphors of the body and illness since medieval times, including the currently dominant machinery and military metaphorical systems, metaphors of the immune system and cancer, and metaphor and gender.

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Details Gender and the language of illness EPUB

Everyday low 4/5(1). 0 |aGender and the language of illness -- Methods for investigating gender and language -- Men's traditional discourse of illness: distancing and avoidance -- A feminine discourse of illness: transformation and modality -- Emotional disclosure: socio-economic classification, age and gender -- Experience of support: gender, social class and age.

The Handbook of Language and Gender Edited by Janet Holmes and Miriam Meyerhoff The Handbook of Second Language Acquisition book is Representing Rape: Language and Sexual Consent (Routledge, ). Alice F. Freed is Professor of Linguistics and a member of the Women's Studies.

Men and women talk the same amount / 16 (%) No clear pattern / 4 (%) Source: based on Deborah James and Janice Drakich, 'Understanding Gender Differences in Amount of Talk', in Deborah. SEX/GENDER.

Although the terms sex and gender are often used interchangeably, they, in fact, have distinct meanings.

Sex is a classification based on biological differences—for example, differences between males and females rooted in their anatomy or physiology. By contrast, gender is a classification based on the social construction (and maintenance) of cultural Cited by: 2.

This book was written by a girl who, with her family had to hide from the Nazis. The book is her written journal from when she was in hiding.

I don't understand why this is in a, Woman and mental illness list. Another is Judith Herman's " Trauma and Recovery". This book was a seminal work in the " Trauma Informed Care " Movement.

LANGUAGE EDUCATION AND GENDER INTRODUCTION In the past three decades, gender issues have received a wide coverage in the education literature. Working at the intersections of gender, race, and class, education scholars have tried to understand which students are disadvantaged by particular contexts and what can be done to address these inequities.

Gender in English is what’s called natural gender; for instance, boy and girl are examples of masculine and feminine gender words, while computer is an example of a neuter gender word. In German, most gender is unnatural. So instead of referring to. Gender is correlated with the prevalence of certain mental disorders, including depression, anxiety and somatic complaints.

For example, women are more likely to be diagnosed with major depression, while men are more likely to be diagnosed with substance abuse and antisocial personality disorder. There are no marked gender differences in the diagnosis rates of.

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Risk for Mental Illness Varies by Gender. Understanding gender differences is a big issue in all areas of medicine today, including psychiatry, he says. The National Institutes of.

In the Dutch language, the gender of a noun determines the articles, adjective forms and pronouns that are used in reference to that noun.

Gender is a complicated topic in Dutch, because depending on the geographical area or each individual speaker, there are either three genders in a regular structure or a two genders in a dichotomous structure (neuter/common with vestiges.

Language and Gender: A study case 1. Introduction 1 2. Differences in men’s and women’s speech 2 General comments 2 Women talk more/less than men 2 Women break the ‘rules’ of turn-taking more than men 3 book entitled Language and Woman’s Place. In another article she published a set of basicFile Size: KB.

Language and Gender Women's language and men's language The opening words of Simone de Beauvoir's historic book The Second Sex capture the essential characteristic of gender: 'One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.' Gender is a socially rather than a biologically constructed attribute -- people are not born with but rather learn the.

We’re celebrating the end of the year with our most popular posts fromplus a few of our favorites tossed in. Enjoy. Philosopher Sandra Lee Bartky once observed that being feminine often means using one’s body to portray powerlessness.

Consider: A feminine person keeps her body small and contained; she makes sure that it doesn’t take up to much space or. By reading the Bildungsroman as a 'coming of age' novel, the book asks how the telling of a life in time affects individual age narratives.

Bringing together the different perspectives of age and disability studies, the book argues that illness is already an important issue in the Bildungsroman 's narratives of by: 7. language, gender, and sexuality, her major publications include Gender Articu-lated: Language and the Socially Constructed Self (with Mary Bucholtz; Routledge, ) and Queerly Phrased: Language, Gender, and Sexuality (with Anna Livia; Oxford University Press, ).

She is currently writing a book on the language. Read "Ageing, Gender, and Illness in Anglophone Literature Narrating Age in the Bildungsroman" by Heike Hartung available from Rakuten Kobo.

This study establishes age as a category of literary history, delineating age in its interaction with gender and narrati Brand: Taylor And Francis.Read "Gender, Health And Illness The Case Of Nerves" by available from Rakuten Kobo. First published in Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa : Taylor And Francis.